Feeds:
Entradas
Comentarios

Posts Tagged ‘Aeronáutica y Espacio’

 

📷 NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory-Caltech

Anuncios

Read Full Post »

The Event Horizon Telescope has captured a photo of a supermassive black hole at the center of M87, a galaxy 54 million light years away.

Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al.

 

In the century since Einstein predicted the existence of black holes in his theory of gravity, astrophysicists have turned up overwhelming evidence for the things. They’ve observed the push and pull of black holes on the orbits of nearby stars and planets. They’ve heard the vibrations, or gravitational waves, resonating from black holes colliding. But they’d never glimpsed a black hole face to face—until now. On Wednesday, astrophysicists announced they had captured the first-ever image of a black hole.

The picture, taken over five days of observations in April 2017 using eight telescopes around the world by a collaboration known as the Event Horizon Telescope, depicts luminous gas swirling around a supermassive black hole at the center of M87, a galaxy 54 million light-years away. Past the bright lights, though, is the black hole’s telltale feature: its event horizon. The event horizon is the edge of the spacetime abyss, where gravity is so strong that no light can escape from it. “It’s the point of no return,” says Feryal Özel of the University of Arizona, who is a member of the EHT collaboration. In the image, it manifests itself as the “sudden absence of light,” she says.

Previously, researchers had captured a blobby jet of light emerging from where the M87 black hole was predicted to be—but they couldn’t definitively see the black hole because their instruments were nowhere near as sharp as EHT’s. “It’s like going from a cheap smartphone camera to a high definition IMAX cinema,” says astrophysicist Andrew Strominger of Harvard University, who was not involved in the work.

 

The South Pole Telescope, one of eight telescopes used to capture the first black hole image. Dan Marrone/

This black hole is about 6.5 billion times the mass of the sun. Still, it’s tiny from a vantage point on Earth, just 50 microarcseconds wide in the sky, which makes it about as hard to see as a donut placed on the moon. It took eight different telescopes to image it. The telescopes collected observational data that was synced with the precision of a billionth of a second.

To see the black hole’s boundary between light and dark, the astrophysicists captured radio waves—light 1.3 millimeters in wavelength, invisible to the human eye—emitted by the gas swirling around the black hole. The gas emits light of all different wavelengths, including visible light, but the researchers chose this particular wavelength because it can sail through entire galaxies and even Earth’s own atmosphere without being absorbed. But they still needed good weather at all eight of their telescope sites to see the black hole. Before switching on their telescopes, they had to monitor the moisture in the air, says Özel—too much humidity would ruin their images. To minimize the chance of rain, they built the telescopes in dry regions, including the South Pole and the Atacama Desert in Chile.

M87’s black hole is relatively close to Earth, as the light coming from it was only emitted 54 million years ago—so we’re seeing it at a more mature moment in its existence. “At this point in the age of the universe, black holes have calmed down,” says Özel. “They’re basically eating gas trickling in from nearby stars.” M87’s black hole does emit bright jets of gas, but it’s still pretty dim compared to younger black holes that are further away. These younger black holes accumulate larger amounts of matter, so their swirls of luminous gas shine brighter.

 

Source: wired.com

Read Full Post »

View this post on Instagram

Airbus A400M #airbus #airbusa400m

A post shared by Charly W. Karl (@cwk_onlyplanes) on

 

The A400M is the most advanced, proven and certified airlifter available, combining 21st century state-of-the-art technologies to fulfill the current and upcoming Armed Forces’ needs. The A400M combines the capability to carry strategic loads with the ability to deliver even into tactical locations with small and unprepared airstrips. And in addition it acts as a frontline-tanker for other aircraft. One aircraft, which can do the work of three – The A400M.

 

Web: A400M

Read Full Post »

 

A new immersive, 360-degree, ultra-high-definition visualization allows viewers to view the center of our Galaxy as if they were sitting in the position of the Milky Way’s supermassive black hole (Sgr A*). By combining supercomputer simulations with Chandra data, the visualization shows the effects of dozens of massive stellar giants with fierce winds blowing off their surfaces in the region covering a few light years surrounding Sgr A*.

Blue and cyan represent X-ray emission from hot gas with temperatures of tens of millions of degrees, while the red emission shows ultraviolet emission from moderately dense regions of cooler gas with temperatures of tens of thousands of degrees, and yellow shows the cooler gas with the highest densities.

 

Source: Chandra X-ray Observatory – NASA’s flagship X-ray telescope

Read Full Post »

 

FACET – short for Future Air Traffic Management Concepts Evaluation Tool –was such a hit when it was introduced a decade ago that NASA named it the agency’s Software of the Year for 2006. As a research tool, FACET quickly analyzes thousands of aircraft paths and displays them on a map. One of FACET’s new features is to display global flight trajectories between the continents. NASA receives data from the Official Airline Guide, which provides the departure and arrival cities, and the expected departure and arrival times.

FACET then draws a Great Circle route between the city pairs and calculates where the aircraft would be at any given time. NASA has used this capability to study the impact of global aviation emissions on the environment.

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

 

Source: Guillaume Laffon

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: